Jacksonville International Airport (Guide)

The development of the airport began in 1965 on a modern facility to operate travel near the naval bases. The airport was launched on September 1, 1968, taking the place of ImesonField. Terrain prevented prolonging the runways at Imeson, which was a necessity with the beginning of commercial flights. A new idea at JAX was separating takeoff and landing travelers on various sides of the Terminal. This is not the situation anymore, the airport uses the more conventional layout with takeoff passengers on an upper level with a lifted roadway, and arriving passengers on the lower level.

Information

More about Jacksonville International Airport (Guide)

Jacksonville International Airport (Guide)

General Information

The development of the airport began in 1965 on a modern facility to operate travel near the naval bases. The airport was launched on September 1, 1968, taking the place of ImesonField. Terrain prevented prolonging the runways at Imeson, which was a necessity with the beginning of commercial flights. A new idea at JAX was separating takeoff and landing travelers on various sides of the Terminal. This is not the situation anymore, the airport uses the more conventional layout with takeoff passengers on an upper level with a lifted roadway, and arriving passengers on the lower level.

Capacity

The newly constructed airport was not quick to expand; it was serving just two million passengers yearly by 1982. However, it served more than five million annually by 1999, so an extension project was adopted in 2000. The first stage involved reconstructing the collapsed Terminal, central square, the main concessions, and parking capacity, which was completed in 2004–2005. Around 6,319,016 passengers were processed, through JAX Concourse C, alongside with consolidating the security checkpoints at one location.

The second part of the expansion project took more than three years, starting in mid-2006 and anticipated to cost $170 million. Concourses A and C were rebuilt; the previous concourses have been destroyed. Work on Concourse B was given a less priority because the ability of the reconstructed was more than adequate for current demand. Reynolds, Smith & Hills framed the extension.

The financial downturn of 2009 resulted in a decrease in travelers and flights, which led the JAX to start the destruction of Concourse B in June 2009 since it was safer and more accessible for contractors. After the debris was taken out, asphalt was laid to create space for ground tools parking. The concourse will be reconstructed when traveler traffic increases, which the JAX had first predicted would happen in 2013 but did not. A part of the old hall finally became part of an airline club lounge that opened in 2019.

Background and Socio-Economic Influence

A recent economic influence studied by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) discovered that the Jacksonville Aviation Authority (JAA) four-airport scheme contributes above than $6 billion yearly to the city's economy. Florida Statewide Aviation Economic Impact Study gauged that the profits of on-airport influence, visitor expenditure impacts, and doubling effects of JAX.

Jacksonville International Airport generates $3,194,422,000, the most significant economic influence of the four airports the JAA operates. It accommodates 26,396 jobs making a payroll of close to one billion dollars. JAX also offers educational tours and internship programs through community colleges.

Jacksonville International Airport is found in Duval County in northeast Florida. It has two functional runways, with the longest track being 10,000 feet. Equipment at the airport is capable of supporting a complete range of commercial airlines. JAX serves a mix of personal, business, leisure, and related travel. About 2.5 million enplanements for commercial passengers go through this airport yearly. Almost 52% of these enplanements are passengers whose expenditure helps to contribute to the airport economic impact. It has easy access from Interstate 95, and its proximity to this significant interstate is essential to supporting air cargo activity at the airport.

The Jacksonville International Airport has approximately 60 on-site aviation-related tenants that contribute to its annual economic impact. Most of these are dedicated to supporting airlines and commercial passenger travel. The yearly economic impact of JAX is connected with direct effects that are generated from tenants/businesses at the airport and on-airport construction schemes.